Ear Candling

Ear coning can improve glaucoma, which is a fluid pressure related condition. The tissues at the rear of the iris produce a clear lymph-like fluid in the chamber of the eye between the cornea and the lens. When the fluid does not return to the blood stream as quickly as it is formed, it accumulates and compresses the lens and puts pressure on the retina. Ear coning has the ability to relax and open these passageways to improve fluid drainage.

The anterior wall of the middle ear contains an opening that leads directly into the Eustachian tubes which connects the middle ear to the throat. The function of these tubes is to equalize air pressure on both sides of the tympanic membrane. The Eustachian tubes are drains for the Lymphatic system, which cleans the blood. These tubes are quite small and can eventually become plugged, which is partly caused by eating mucus forming foods such as dairy products. This plugged condition will create pressure in the ears and coning will not work properly.

During the ear coning, while the cone is burning, gently massage the Eustachian tube with the other hand, using a small amount of lotion or massage oil on the finger tips. Apply light pressure in an upward direction from the lower jaw to the bottom of the ear. This massaging technique will help to relieve any congestion present. When these tubes are open and relaxed, there will be improved drainage and pressure equalization. 


This will cause the sinuses to start draining.

When an ear infection is present, the Eustachian tubes are usually plugged or swollen closed. Massaging this area while ear coning will assist in opening and draining of these tubes, allowing the built-up pressure of infection and matter stuck in the middle ear area, a place to drain.

The warm smoke is drawn into the ear canal warming the ear wax, which melts slightly above normal body temperature. As the oxygen in the ear canal and the cone is absorbed from the flame, a gentle vacuum is produced. As the cone slowly burns down the heat causes a warm swirling current, creating a spiral that draws smoke into the ear, which softens and melts the excess wax into a liquid along with any foreign materials from the ear canal, and is sucked up through the cone by the vacuum created.

 

This wax is held in the stem of the cone or is burned up by the flame. The ear coning process is also able to pull infections from behind the ear drums. Ear coning creates a stimulating, soothing and warm effect on the skin in and around the ears. The result is improved drainage in the entire head, face and neck areas.